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How does a free pregnancy clinic work?

An Irish-based charity that provides free pregnancy testing has been slammed for a controversial advert.

The advertising campaign for the clinic in Donegal is part of a campaign to boost awareness of the birth control pill.

But it has caused anger in Donecie, Co. Galway, and has prompted calls for an investigation into the company’s advertising practices.

“It’s very offensive,” said local politician and former Donecian councillor Mick McEwan.

“I don’t know what the problem is.

There are no children in the house.

There’s no children at all.

It’s absolutely outrageous.”

The advertising company behind the ad, Freepregnancy, has said the campaign was a response to “a growing public health problem”.

The company’s website says the “birth control pill has a major role to play in the health and wellbeing of our children and their mothers”. But Donecío-based fertility clinic Cervical Birth and Care (CBCC) says the campaign is an “unnecessary and inflammatory” attempt to push an agenda.

“Free pregnancy clinics are a legitimate part of the Irish fertility healthcare sector and we welcome the campaign’s message,” said CBCC CEO, Dr Joanne Murphy.

“The focus on the pill in the campaign does not detract from the many women who rely on free pregnancy tests.”

The advert does not refer to the birth of a baby.

Dr Murphy said the ads were “completely inappropriate”.

“I would never endorse any campaign of this nature,” she said.

She said the Cervicare programme is about “keeping women safe” and the campaign appeared to be an attempt to undermine that. “

We strongly encourage women to discuss birth control with their doctor before getting pregnant and before beginning a pregnancy.”

She said the Cervicare programme is about “keeping women safe” and the campaign appeared to be an attempt to undermine that.

“This is not the way we want to communicate to women,” she added.

“But we have to balance that against the concerns and concerns of the many thousands of women who have relied on free fertility testing and who are worried about the effect this campaign may have on their access to birth control.”

Donec Cllr Mick McElroy, who represents Donec, said he was “deeply concerned” about the ad campaign and that “this is absolutely inappropriate”.

“And we should be doing everything we can to protect them from this.” “

Donegal Cllrs Mick McEllrory and Joan Donnelly both agreed that the campaign failed to provide a clear and positive message about the pill. “

And we should be doing everything we can to protect them from this.”

Donegal Cllrs Mick McEllrory and Joan Donnelly both agreed that the campaign failed to provide a clear and positive message about the pill.

They said it failed to highlight that there are women in Donecé who are in need of free fertility tests.

“When people are asked about the benefits, there is not a clear one.

We don’t have a clear definition,” said Joan.

“There is no mention of the pill being free, free or free at all.”

In Donegal, a spokeswoman for Cervacare said the company “does not endorse this campaign”.

“We’re proud to be the first local fertility clinic in Ireland to offer free pregnancy test services to women over 18 years of age,” she told The Irish Mail on Sunday.

“Cervacares work with thousands of couples across the country to provide them with free fertility screening.

We provide free pregnancy exams for women over the age of 18 years and offer them free contraception and contraception counselling as part of our pregnancy counselling services.”

The spokeswoman added that free pregnancy checks had been conducted for more than 40,000 people since January 2011.

The Cervasire clinic, however, said there had been no increase in customers since that time.

“These numbers have been well over the years,” said Ms Murphy.

She said that since January 2015, the clinic had “had no increase” in patients and that it was “a good year”.

Ms Murphy said that in the first six months of 2017, “the number of appointments for free pregnancy screenings have been steady”.

She said they were “the same number that we did in the same period in 2016”.

She added that in 2017, free pregnancy clinics had seen a significant rise in the number of visits, mainly due to a rise in women seeking free fertility check.

She also said that there was a “huge surge” in referrals from women seeking counselling.

A spokesperson for the Irish Fertility Society (IFS), which represents fertility clinics, said that the figures reflected the fact that there were a “considerable number of women” using free pregnancy check services.

They are not using free fertility test services but they are certainly